EMDR

What is EMDR Treatment?

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), is an evidenced-based, well-researched psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). EMDR may also be used as a treatment technique to address a wide variety of issues such as:

EMDR is a wonderful way to process painful and disturbing memories associated with past trauma in a relatively quick and supportive manner.  EMDR is an approach to treatment that views dysfunction and health from an Adaptive Information Processing (AIP) model. According to AIP theory, our experiences and how we process and store them in memory affects how we perceive, experience, behave and respond to subsequent life events. When we experience an event that is disturbing and causes significantly high levels of arousal, our normal system of processing and storing of information can get derailed, causing the memories of that event to get stored in a maladaptive form of memory.

How Does EMDR Work?

EMDR helps the brain to resume normal information processing which allows the disturbing memories to shift to an adaptive resolution. The mechanism by which this works seems to be similar to what occurs naturally during the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of sleep in which our eyes move rapidly back and forth as a means to process unresolved emotional material.

The EMDR protocol developed by Francine Shapiro Ph.D. consists of 8 phases and involves a three-pronged approach to treatment that addresses 1) past experiences that contribute to the current symptoms, 2) present day triggers for dysfunction and 3) future adaptive behaviors and the positive experiences needed to strengthen and support emotional and mental health.

Goals of EMDR Treatment

The goal of EMDR is to reprocess the memories of disturbing life experiences that are causing the current symptoms so that those experiences can be integrated in an adaptive manner, and are no longer intrusive or actively affecting the trauma survivor.

Classic EMDR & Attachment-Focused EMDR

Always on the cutting edge of both new and innovative treatments, our EMDR clinicians at At A New Beginning have received training in both “Classic” EMDR as well as newer models such as Dr. Laurel Parnell’s “Attachment-Focused EMDR.”  Clinicians who utilize EMDR in their treatment approach at A New Beginning, include: 

 

EMDR is a powerful, evidenced-based therapeutic technique that helps you resolve and repair trauma-related issues, consequential negative beliefs, and unhealthy behaviors that can affect your quality of life.  We enthusiastically utilize EMDR in our treatment approach when appropriate with clients who desire utilizing this innovative technique as part of their treatment plan.